Too Much World, Too Little Reality: Recent Works by artists Minji Sohn and Ben Quinn, curated by Katy Crocker and Á.R. Vázquez-Concepción at Cranium Corporation, from July 25 —August 20, 2015

The exhibition Too Much World, Too Little Reality addresses the circulation of digital images and technologies as presented in the work of artists Minji Sohn, and Ben Quinn. This two-person exhibition points to the relationship between art, technology, and daily life as described by artist Hito Steyerl in a text titled Too Much World: Is the Internet Dead?

Steyerl writes, “[I]f images start pouring across screens and invading subject and object matter, the major, and quite overlooked consequence is that reality now widely consists of images: or rather, of things, constellations, and processes formerly evident as images.”

The exhibition Too Much World, Too Little Reality exists in the hybridized context of a gallery within a home, to intimately examine the universal shift in reality construction Steyerl captures. How does this new condition of reality penetrate even our most private worlds?

The exhibition includes painting, sculpture, installation, and video of a performance by Minji Sohn. It was curated by Katy Crocker and Ralph Vázquez-Concepción, and will be on view until August 20, 2015. For any questions or to schedule a visit write to us by clicking here.  

Minji Sohn (b. 1990, Japan) produces work that oscillates between obsession and play. A performance and installation artist, her approach is one that explores the way reason and emotions —purpose and havoc— exist both parallel and commingled in the human mind, sometimes to deleterious effect. Deploying technology and her body her work apply formulaic thought to impulses or actions that challenge logic or preclude pragmatism. Sohn then capitalizes on the aesthetic disruption that her interventions create. For Too Much World, Too Little Reality produced two artworks, an installation and a performance piece, titled no bitch and Peace, Cut, Throw respectively.

no bitch, 2015, ladder, magnifying glass, and iPhone, by Minji Sohn
no bitch, 2015, ladder, magnifying glass, and iPhone, by Minji Sohn



Ben Quinn (b. 1991, USA) works incorporating images sourced from the Internet, with a pictorial style that invokes expressionism, as well as geometric and non-geometric abstraction, as filtered through a meme. His maximal style dialogues with previous moments in the heroic (and absurd) history of modern and postmodern painting. Quinn imbricates diverse painting techniques with digitally printed imagery in a savage mode that appears to both praise and object to the status of painting in contemporary art history.

Here is the group of paintings by Ben Quinn included in Too Much World, Too Little Reality:

Peace, 2014, digital Canvas print, by Ben Quinn
Peace, 2014, digital canvas print, by Ben Quinn
Burning Flag, 2015, digital print, oil, airbrush, and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Burning Flag, 2015, digital print, oil, airbrush, and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Paint Huffer, 2015, digital print, ink, and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Paint Huffer, 2015, digital print, ink, and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Man in the Mirror, 2015, digital print, acrylic, airbrush, screen print and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Man in the Mirror, 2015, digital print, acrylic, airbrush, screen print and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
What’s the Point, 2015, Xerox print, oil, and aerosol on canvas, by Ben Quinn
What’s the Point, 2015, Xerox print, oil, and aerosol on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Sick Earth, 2015, laser engraved glass cube, by Ben Quinn
Sick Earth, 2015, laser engraved glass cube, by Ben Quinn
UFOs Over Home, 2014, latex and oil on glass, drawn with 9” nail (shown backlit over light box), by Ben Quinn
UFOs Over Home, 2014, latex and oil on glass, drawn with 9” nail (shown backlit over light box), by Ben Quinn
Pindar, the Lizard King, 2015, digital print, oil, graphite, and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Pindar, the Lizard King, 2015, digital print, oil, graphite, and collage on canvas, by Ben Quinn
Mouse Hole, 2015, vinyl cut-out, by Ben Quinn
Mouse Hole, 2015, vinyl cut-out, by Ben Quinn

All photos by Cranium Corporation, 2015.

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